Smaller Default Larger

Waste

  • GGH Wyoming to open new waste facility

    GGH Wyoming, LLC will open a waste management facility in Bill, Wyoming for the oil and gas exploration and production industry.

    The facility, called Grasslands Environmental, is a turnkey waste management facility that is designed to serve the disposal and water needs of Wyoming’s oil and gas exploration and production industry at a single location.

    The facility will include a commercial oilfield wastewater disposal facility, an industrial landfill, a non-potable water supply well and two Class I injection wells.

    Published in the November 2014 Edition of American Recycler News

  • Republic Services acquires Rainbow Disposal Co.

    Republic Services, Inc. disclosed the acquisition of one of Southern California’s largest independent solid waste companies, Rainbow Disposal Co., Inc. The transaction further enhances Republic’s Southern California footprint, and reinforces the company’s growth strategy to expand its operations through targeted, accretive acquisitions.

    Republic has acquired Rainbow’s state-of-the-art business and facilities, which include hauling routes in Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley, Midway City, Westminster, Orange County, Newport Beach and Irvine as well as a recycling facility, a transfer station, a compressed natural gas (CNG) refueling station, and a vehicle fleet,  powered by CNG.

    As part of the transaction, the primary principals at Rainbow, Jerry Moffatt and Jeff Snow, have joined Republic Services and will lead a newly created business unit of the company based at the Huntington Beach campus. Republic’s new business unit will continue to serve residential and commercial customers, providing waste collection, transfer, disposal, diversified material recovery/recycling and organic composting.

    Published in the November 2014 Edition of American Recycler News

  • Equipment Spotlight | NOV 2014 Truck Scales

    by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    As the electronics market expands exponentially, more and more efforts are made to prevent discarded electronics from ending up in landfills.

  • Six more charged in DEP dumping crackdown

    The Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) initiative to crack down on illegal dumping in state parks and lands has yielded six more enforcement actions, all related to illegal dumping in New Jersey.

  • EPA works to improve operations at landfill

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the owner and the operator of the Moca Municipal Solid Waste Landfill in Moca, Puerto Rico, have reached an agreement that will result in improvements at the landfill.

  • WM awards KAB affiliates Think Green grants

    Keep America Beautiful (KAB) and Waste Management stated that $10,000 Think Green® Grants were being awarded to 8 KAB community-based affiliates across the country.

  • Sunshine produces renewable energy in California

    Sunshine Gas Producers, a joint venture between DTE Biomass Energy and EIF Renewable Energy Holdings through its subsidiary Landfill Energy Systems, has started generating electricity from landfill gas at its recently constructed renewable energy facility at the Sunshine Canyon Landfill in Sylmar.

  • BJ’s Wholesale joins EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional administrator Judith A. Enck was joined by Senator Cory Booker, Congressman Frank Pallone, BJ’s Wholesale Club’s Doug Schiefelbein Community Food Bank of New Jersey’s (CFBNJ) Tristan Wallack and Edison Mayor Thomas Lankey to announce BJ’s participation in the EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge program at the store in Edison, New Jersey.

  • Global industrial waste market to double by 2020

    Regulations that facilitate a shift away from landfill towards more value-adding segments such as recycling are lending momentum to the global industrial waste management services market.

  • Eleven more GM facilities achieve landfill-free status

    Eleven additional General Motors facilities have achieved landfill-free status. The running total is 122 manufacturing and non-manufacturing operations spanning Asia, Europe, and South and North America that recycle, reuse or convert to energy all waste from daily operations.

    “Our landfill-free movement is part of our culture of continuous improvement embraced by teams globally,” said Jim DeLuca, GM executive vice president of Global Manufacturing. “Not only does it make our operations more efficient and help conserve vital resources, but we’re able to reinvest the money we get from recycling into future vehicles for our customers.”

    GM’s new landfill-free facilities include:

    •CAMI Assembly (Canada)
    •Colmotores Assembly (Colombia)
    •Joinville Engine (Brazil)
    •Zaragoza Assembly (Spain)
    •Zaragoza Stamping (Spain)
    •Grand Rapids Operations (Michigan)
    •Burton Warehouse and Distribution Center (Michigan)
    •GM Heritage Center (Michigan)
    •Shanghai Headquarters (China)
    •Luton Warehouse (England)
    •Fontana Warehouse and Distribution Center (California)

    The addition of these 11 facilities to landfill-free status helps GM avoid more than 600,000 metric tons of CO2-equivalent emissions. This is comparable to the greenhouse gas benefit of 15 million tree seedlings grown for 10 years.

    “Our ultimate goal is not to generate any waste at all,” said John Bradburn, GM global manager of waste reduction. “Until then, we do everything we can to ensure it doesn’t end up in the ground. From connecting our suppliers on special recycling projects to reusing packaging, we apply lessons learned across all of our operations to broaden the positive impact.”

    Employee awareness is key in the drive to landfill-free. Colmotores Assembly in Colombia launched awareness campaigns that engaged employees in reducing waste and sorting it correctly. GM’s Shanghai headquarters, a LEED-Gold facility, formed a “Green Team” spanning IT, finance, facilities, R&D and supply chain departments to identify recycling and waste reduction opportunities. Luton Warehouse attributes its success to a robust training initiative that drove a zero-waste culture.

    All of these facilities treat their waste as resources out of place and employ a number of methods to give them a second or third life.

    Reduce: Zaragoza Assembly changed its manufacturing process to reduce solvent consumption from its paint shop; it now reuses 80 percent of it. Packaging continues to be a large waste stream for many plants and CAMI Assembly is tackling it by setting aggressive targets to reduce non-reusable packaging.

    Reuse: Grand Rapids Operations’ in-house oil recycling saves GM $1.2 million per year. It recycles and reuses every gallon of oil it buys from a refinery several times.

    Recycle: CAMI Assembly turns scrap wood into mulch for its wetlands and Grand Rapids Operations recycles grinding wheels as sandpaper. The Grand Rapids site also works with a partner that processes wastewater treatment sludge into a fuel source for the building materials industry.

    Compost: Zaragoza composts wastewater treatment sludge to create fertilizer and Joinville Engine composts its organic cafeteria waste to provide additional nutrients for the site’s trees and plants.

    A strong network of recycling partners and suppliers helps facilities achieve their goals. Localizing the supply chain strengthens the business case and reduces overall carbon footprint. One of Zaragoza’s biggest challenges was finding a nearby partner to efficiently transport and treat paint sludge so it could be used to generate electricity. Burton Warehouse and Distribution Center hired a waste technician to help sort packaging waste generated from expanded shipping and distribution operations. A new recycling partner helped push GM’s Heritage Center to landfill-free status.

    According to GM, landfill-free has no finish line. For example, Colmotores Assembly set a goal to work with suppliers on minimizing packaging waste and designing products for easier reuse or recycling.

    GM’s goal is to achieve 125 landfill-free sites globally by 2020. The company already has met its 10 percent total waste reduction commitment – 7 years ahead of schedule.

    Published in the November 2014 Edition of American Recycler News

  • PWS revs up CNG conversion

    Progressive Waste Solutions Ltd. (PWS) has added about 250 natural gas-powered trucks to its waste and recycling collection fleet since it announced its commitment in May 2013 to increase the number of compressed natural gas (CNG) powered trucks it purchases.

  • New waste-to-energy businesses in Italy created

    Reservoir Capital Corp. has entered into a Letter of Intent (LOI) with Saxa Gres S.r.L. to develop recycling, manufacturing, waste-to-energy and renewable energy businesses in Italy.

  • Cascade Cart helps fund the fight against Alzheimer’s

    Cascade Cart Solutions, a division of Cascade Engineering, is joining the fight against Alzheimers with the launch of its purple Alzheimer’s Cart. Proceeds from the sale of each first-of-its-kind purple cart and bin will be donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

  • Illegal dumping fought with grant

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded Conejos County Clean Water, Inc. (CCCW) of Antonito, Colorado, a $120,000 Environmental Justice grant to address illegal dumping in the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado.

  • B&M and MBTA to perform cleanup of Iron Horse Park site

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached a $4.2 million settlement with Boston and Maine Corp. (B&M) and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for partial reimbursement of EPA’s past costs, and for full payment and performance of future cleanup work at the Iron Horse Park Superfund Site, Operable Unit 4 (OU4), in Billerica, Massachusetts.

  • More big batteries enter recycling stream

    by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    When people think about big batteries, they usually think about lead-acid automotive batteries, but these are only one type of battery coming to scrap yards these days, like those from electric vehicles (EVs) and from backup storage arrays.

  • Software technology reduces fuel costs for refuse trucks

    “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.” This brainy notion from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures is often quoted by strategic planners to make a foundational point.

  • Bluesphere to convert emissions from landfills into clean energy

    Bluesphere Corp., a clean energy company that develops, manages and owns waste-to-energy projects, is pursuing a strategy to work in partnership with landfill owners to convert harmful methane gas emissions from landfills into electricity.

  • National waste associations comment on proposed revision to landfill regulations

    The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) and the National Waste & Recycling Association (NW&RA) have jointly provided comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on its proposed rules to update the Standards of Performance for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.

  • Ford’s Oakville assembly plant goes landfill-free in Canada

    The Oakville Assembly plant now sends no operational waste to landfills, an achievement that gives Ford Motor Company the distinction of becoming landfill-free at all its manufacturing facilities in Canada.