HOT HOT HOT:

  • Advertise with American Recycler today!

  • CALL FOR CURRENT SPECIALS - WE WANT TO WORK WITH YOU!

  • Publish an ad in American Recycler because we get results. Don't hesitate!

Smaller Default Larger

FLOR Inc., revealed that the brand collected roughly 3,000 pounds of Denver, Colorado residents’ used rugs and carpets on America Recycles Day.

Add a comment

Voters in Massachusetts turned down a proposal calling for an expansion of the state’s bottle deposit law.

Add a comment

“Clothes the Loop” is the theme of a statewide campaign to promote clothing and textile recycling.

Throughout New York, municipalities are initiating an outreach campaign that encourages residents to “Clothes the Loop” by recycling their unwanted clothing and household textiles.

“By engaging local municipalities to promote clothing and textile recycling, the New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse and Recycling (NYSAR3) is making a great step forward in educating the public about the importance of keeping used clothing out of landfills,” says Jackie King, executive director of Secondary Materials And Recycled Textiles (SMART) Association.

SMART is the international trade association of the for-profit textile and used clothing recycling industry, while the Council for Textile Recycling works to bring together all aspects of clothing recycling including manufacturers, retailers, consumers, academicians, and municipal employees.

According to NYSAR3, each year, New York State residents dispose of some 1.4 billion pounds of recoverable clothes and textiles, with an estimated market value over $200 million. NYSAR3 estimates that some 9,600 jobs would be created across the state if that material was dropped off for reuse and recycling. Across the country, only 15 percent of recyclable clothes and textiles are actually recovered; 85 percent ends up in the trash.

SMART estimates the average person throws away 70 pounds of used clothing annually; of those 70 pounds, 95 percent could have been reused or recycled. Industry officials say only clothing that is wet (mildewed) or has been contaminated with a solvent such as gasoline, paint, or odorous cleaner cannot be recycled.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency’s most recent report on municipal solid waste (2012), 14.33 million tons of waste is generated annually that is exclusively clothing and other household textiles. Of that amount, only 15.7 percent or 2.25 million tons is recycled.

Published in the January 2015 Edition of American Recycler News

Add a comment

The Recycling Research Foundation (RRF), a nonprofit organization associated with the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), named Joseph Grogan as the recipient of its 2014 National Scholarship.

Add a comment

In a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Mack Trucks Inc. has agreed to properly manage the hazardous waste at its truck assembly plant in Macungie, Pennsylvania.

Add a comment

by ROBERT FINN, President and CEO of RSR Corporation

We’ve all been there. It’s a weekday morning and you are late to work. You rush to the car, put the key in the ignition, turn and…nothing.

Add a comment