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A record 7.3 million pounds of single use and rechargeable batteries recycled at the mid-year mark, an increase of 20 percent compared to the same time period last year, was reported by Call2Recycle, Inc., the first and largest consumer battery stewardship organization serving the U.S. and Canada.

This achievement contributes to the more than 115 million pounds  of batteries diverted from U.S. and Canadian landfills and responsibly recycled by the organization over the past 20 years.

In the U.S., retailers and municipalities contributed to the strong growth in battery collections, up 17 percent and 147 percent respectively this year, resulting in almost 2.4 million pounds accumulated. This success can be partially attributed to Vermont becoming the first state in the U.S. requiring producers to finance a collection and recycling program for single-use (primary) batteries. As the appointed stewardship organization, Call2Recycle provides convenient drop-off locations for residents to responsibly recycle their batteries. As a result, more than 54,000 pounds of batteries have been collected in Vermont since the program launched in January, more than what was collected in the state in all of 2015.

In Canada, collections rose 24 percent compared to last year, resulting in 3.2 million pounds recycled year to date. Quebec leads the charge on recycling, collecting more than 1.3 million pounds. Battery collections in Manitoba also saw a significant increase in collections, up 52 percent from last year, as did all other provinces (including British Columbia and Ontario) which recorded double-digit growth. As the result of dedicated consumer-focused campaigns, publicly accessible channels - municipalities (up 40 percent) and retailers (up 16 percent) across Canada – also contributed to the growth.

Published in the October 2016 Edition of American Recycler News